Tag Archives: window

Joel and Joshua, Siblings Ready for Adoption!

Joel and Joshua are two of the most beautiful young tabby kittens you can imagine!  They not only look great but they are the most sweet and fun-loving "kits" you can find anywhere! 

In the late summer 2013, these two kittens were found lying in a yard in a small town across the Wisconsin River from Richland County. The kittens were in very bad condition and at first the young boy who found them thought they were dead. He took the kittens home to his mom who called OMHS to help save these babies. The kittens were a mess… they were covered with lice, for starters… malnourished, missing some fur, weak, and very needy. 

The OMHS Cat Adoption volunteers gave the kittens the nickname "Monkeys" because they were so skinny, and thier little faces looked like very tiny monkeys when they climbed up the side of the large pen they were in to peek into the window into the next room!  The volunteers would look up from their work cleaning litterboxes and other chores and there would be those two tiny faces… Monkey faces… peering through the window! It was like a game!  The kittens gained weight and learned how to play and enjoy life once they were not starving and had energy to spare.  Joshua and Joel are truly two very special young cats!

OMHS gave them great care and they have developed into the personable and handsome pair you see here.  They have been socialized with other cats… senior cats and youngsters.  Joshua and Joel are neutered and up-to-date on vaccinations. 

All they need now is a new and loving home where they can continue to enjoy life and bring joy and even more happiness to a household.

Come interview Joshua and Joel at the Adoption Center, 1400 West Seminary Street, Richland Center.  The Adoption Center is located directly behind the main building at Schmitt Woodland Hills Retirement Community.  Hours: Wednesdays, 4:30 to 6 pm. and Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 12 noon.  See you there!

Low Adoption Rates are now in place! 


Posted in Available Cats, OMHS News - Current/Recent | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

For the Sake of Your Pet’s Health Do NOT Smoke Indoors!

    Do you have companion animals and a smoker in your household?  If your answer to both parts of this question is YES, please, for the sake of your pets and your family, take immediate steps to eliminate smoking indoors.  Of course, the best solution to the problem is to eliminate smoking entirely.  However, in lieu of that solution, in order to more quickly (and easily) protect dogs, cats, birds, and other pets, both OMHS and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals strongly encourage smokers to go outdoors for that pipe, cigar, or cigarette. In other words, “Take It (Your Smoking Habit) Outside!”

    Most of us have heard the statistics: that second-hand smoke takes the lives of over 50,000 Americans per year and that an additional 4 million youth are exposed annually to the dangers of second-hand smoke.  It stands to reason, then, that there is now a growing body of scientific research, including studies at leading universities across the USA, indicating that, when exposed to the toxins in second-hand smoke, our companion-animal family members also suffer irreparable health dangers (including respiratory problems, allergies, nasal and lung cancer, lymphoma, and death)

    It comes as no surprise that second-hand tobacco smoke is toxic to pets. Dogs and cats share some common physiology with us humans, so many things that are toxic to people are also toxic to animals. The ASPCA, one of the largest animal-rights groups in the U.S., lists tobacco smoke as a dangerous toxin to pets. Dr. Sharon Gwaltney-Brant, medical director of the ASPCA's Animal Poison Control Center, says: "Nicotine from second-hand smoke can have effects to the nervous systems of cats and dogs. Environmental tobacco smoke has been shown to contain numerous cancer-causing compounds, making it hazardous for animals as well as humans.”

    And now there is proof that “third-hand smoke,” not even considered a danger in the past, is very much in the picture, particularly for cats. A Harvard Medical School study published in the Journal of Pediatrics found health risks associated with “third-hand smoke,” which is the invisible and toxic combination of gases and particles clinging to smokers’ hair and clothing, cars, and carpeting that lingers long after the second-hand smoke has cleared a room. For example, third-hand smoke is what you smell when a smoker gets into an elevator with you after having been outside for a cigarette; it is also the source of the odor in a hotel room where people have been smoking, caused by the “smoke” left on all the surfaces in the room.

    Not only does a pet in a smoking household breathe smoke-filled air, but he also lies directly on the carpet and furniture and on your lap, thereby picking up toxins clinging to the clothes or other objects in the room and the entire house or apartment. Then, the pet grooms himself, ingesting whatever toxic particles are present on its fur and paws. Granted, dogs are allowed outdoors periodically, but indoor cats and other indoor pets are “trapped” inside and continually exposed to dangerous toxins, and even animals that are let outside periodically are trapped indoors for hours or days at a time and are, therefore, victims of their owners’ habits. And, no, opening a window is not enough to get rid of third-hand smoke because third-hand toxic dangers are still there on all the surfaces.  Even very small amounts of inhaled smoke and third-hand smoke toxins can have damaging effects on pets. A  Tufts University study links second-hand smoke to cancer in cats. The study found that cats living with smokers were twice as likely to develop malignant lymphoma, the most common feline cancer, as those in non-smoking households. (Lymphoma occurs in the lymph nodes and kills three out of four afflicted cats within 12 months.)  One reason that cats are so vulnerable to the carcinogens in tobacco smoke and the toxins in third-hand smoke residue is that they are meticulous groomers. Over a long period of time, daily grooming can expose their delicate oral tissues to hazardous amounts of carcinogens. Oral cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) is even more prevalent in cats that live with more than one smoker. A University of Minnesota study shows that cats living in a household with a smoker have nicotine and other smoke toxins in their urine so the smoke related toxins go systemic. Respiratory problems for cats are very prevalent if the cat lives in a smoking household. Recurring bouts with respiratory issues and the likelihood of pneumonia is a definite concern.

    A Colorado St. University study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology found a higher incidence of nasal tumors and cancer of the sinus in dogs living in a home with smokers, compared to those living in a smoke-free environment. The nasal/sinus tumor were specifically found among the long-nosed breeds such as retrievers and German shepherds. And dogs with nasal cancer do not usually survive more than one year. The same study showed higher lung cancer rates in short- to medium-nosed dogs, such as boxers and bulldogs, who live with smokers. Their shorter nasal passages made it easier for cancer-causing particles to reach the lungs.  Another study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology found that dogs in smoking households have a 60 percent greater risk of lung cancer than those in non-smoking households.

       If you have pet birds in your home, they are  hypersensitive to the dangers of smoking.  You have probably heard of coal miners taking a caged canary into the mine with them. If the air in the mine suddenly began to fill with carbon monoxide or methane, the canary would die very quickly, and the miners would scramble to escape. This is because canaries are much more sensitive to the toxins than humans.  A bird circulates each breath of air through its lungs twice. The exchange mechanism in the blood vessels is ultra-effective; thus, birds are able to draw more oxygen out of the air (essential for their high metabolic rate) than mammals. However, this efficiency is not confined to oxygen; other material in the air is equally effectively absorbed. Thus, birds are not only adversely affected by the environmental smoke of a lighted cigarette, but also by second-hand smoke and the toxins of third-hand smoke on caretakers’ hands and clothes.  So, if you love your parrot, parakeet, lovebird, or cockatiel, again, please “Take It (Your Smoking Habit) Outside."
    
        Second- and third-hand smoke are not the only dangers faced by pets that live in smoke-filled environments.  Poisoning is another risk they face. If cigarettes and other tobacco products aren’t properly secured, curious pets can eat them, and, if eaten by a pet, the often-fatal result is nicotine poisoning.  For this reason, smoking paraphernalia and cigarette butts should not be left out where a pet can reach them, including in ash trays.  Signs and symptoms of nicotine poisoning in a dog or cat include tremors, twitching, or seizures; drooling; constricted pupils; auditory and/or visual hallucinations; a racing heart (combined with a slow heart rate with small doses); vomiting; and diarrhea.  If you suspect that your pet has ingested nicotine, call your vet or the Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435 immediately!

What You Can Do to Protect Your Pets — Until You Quit Smoking?
To minimize the risks to your animal companions while you’re trying to quitting smoking, you can do the following:

  •   Promise yourself and your pets that you will “Take It  (Your Smoking Habit) Outside,” thereby preventing a large share of smoke particles from settling in your  home or car and reducing your pet's toxic load.
  •   Use a high quality air purifier in your home to help remove excess toxins.
  •  Change your clothes after smoking, and wash your clothing right away… or, at the very least, air them out outdoors.
  •   After smoking (and before you touch your pets), wash your hands!
  • Ideally, wash your hair after you smoke, especially if you have a pet (or a child) that will be in close         proximity to you. Keep those toxic particles away  from those you love.
  • Keep your ashtrays clean and away from your pets.
  • Dispose of cigars, cigarettes, nicotine gum and patches, snuff, smokeless tobacco, etc. in             receptacles that can't be accessed by pets.  This is material poisonous to your pets!
  •  Have your carpet and upholstered pieces in your home cleaned to remove third-hand smoke toxins.
  • Wash pet beds often to eliminate the third-hand smoke toxins.

The Ocooch Mountain Humane Society encourages pet owners to begin not tomorrow, but TODAY, to reduce the risk of serious disease in both humans and pets by not smoking, nor allowing visitors to smoke, in your household.  You owe yourself and ALL of the members of your family, including your pets, the right to breathe clean air and to live in a smoke-toxin-free environment.  If for no other reason, “Take It  Outside” for your pets, and they will reward you with mountains of unconditional love for years to come!  Help save your pet's life beginning today.

                                                                       Article compiled and created for OMHS by MLH and edited by MSB

Posted in Humane Education, OMHS News - Current/Recent, Pet Health and Safety | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Zoey is Living the Life of a Pampered Cat!

Greetings from my castle!  My name was June, but my new adoptive friend renamed me Zoey.  He had a contest to name me on his Facebook Page, and, when he called out the names suggested by Fb followers to me, I responded very positively to Zoey!  That is my name and I pleased with it. 

I was born with an extra digit, so I can open many things that other cats can’t, which means that I can explore many areas of my new big home. I am a polydactyl… how cool is that!  Extra toes are very special.   Lucky for me, my new friend keeps me safe from harm by putting all of the bad things away.

I want to be with my buddy all the time, so I follow him to the laundry room each time that he goes there, and, when clothes come out of the dryer, he lets me ride back up in the basket!  My friend is an engineer (and an on-line graduate student in the evenings), so I like to help as much as I can by holding down his pages and pointing to random items, random because it’s not like I understand it.

I also love to watch the birds outside, so my friend, put a large comfy pillow in the big window, and I sit there and watch. My friend even got me a harness, and we take short walks on a leash. We don’t go far, but I like to escape once in a while.

They say that I was shy at the shelter, but since I am the only cat in my home, I can finally talk and be heard, so I chatter all the time, and, of course, my friend talks back.  We have conversations all the time, so, now, when his parents come to visit, I am not shy at all, and I talk to them too!  Yes, I was a shy four-year old cat at the shelter, but, now, I am queen of my castle!

Thank you, OMHS, for giving me the chance I needed to find a wonderful home… it is my castle and I rule!

                                                xoxoxox     Zoey

Posted in OMHS News - Current/Recent, Success Stories: Cats | Tagged , ,

Hot Weather Dangers for Pets (Urgent, edited Re-Post from 5/26/11)

(This entry was edited and re-posted by the administrators at RCWebsiteDesigns.com due to the current weather conditions and temporary unavailability of staff to post from OMHS. Any comments and/or concerns regarding this particular post should be directed to admin@rcwebsitedesigns.com. Thank you.)

With the current hot temperatures, pet owners must focus on pet safety:

Shade and water are a must. Anytime your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun (a doghouse does not provide relief from heat) and plenty of fresh, cool water. Cool water is absorbed more quickly than warmed water in a bowl left exposed to sunlight.  Refresh the water bowl with cool water for the safety of the dog.  Heat stroke can be fatal for pets as well as people.

Limit exercise on hot days. Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. (Dog breeds with the “smushed” in nose cannot breathe well at all in hot weather. Be extremely careful with exercise or walking these dogs in hot weather.) On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws. If the pavement is too hot for you to stand on in your bare feet then it is too hot for your dog's paws. Do not take your dog for a “run” on a leash with you riding your bicycle!

Recognize the signs of heatstroke. In case of an emergency, it's important to be able to identify the symptoms of heat stress caused by exposure to extreme temperatures. When in doubt, contact your veterinarian immediately. Some signs of heatstroke are: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, restlessness, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, and unconsciousness. If the animal shows symptoms of heatstroke, take steps immediately to gradually lower her body temperature and contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Heat build up inside a car or truck is dangerous! Have you noticed how hot it can get inside a car on a summer day — far hotter than it is outside? That's because a car acts like a greenhouse, trapping the sun's heat. A study by the Animal Protection Institute showed that even moderately warm temperatures outside can quickly lead to deadly temperatures inside a closed car. On an 82 degree day the temperature inside a truck or car, with the windows “cracked” open, can rise to 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes the temperature can be up to 120 deadly degrees. Having the windows “cracked” open seems to have basically no impact on the heat rising to unbearable temperatures. The Animal Protection Institute study compared an outside temperature of a shaded area with the inside of an automobile in three states: fully closed, with four windows cracked, and with two windows cracked. Inside temperatures were measured with an indoor/outdoor thermometer and an oven thermometer (both readings are given). The “Inside vehicle” readings are with a regular indoor/outdoor thermometer. The “Oven” readings are with an oven thermometer. All temperatures on the next page use the Fahrenheit scale. 4 windows closed on vehicle…

 


Time                                 Outside temp                         Inside vehicle

9 a.m.

82 degrees

109 degrees

 

9:30 a.m.

87

115

 

10 a.m.

91

115

 

10:30 a.m.

94

114

115

11 a.m.

98

114

119

11:30 a.m.

100

117

124

12 noon

101

119

127

  4 windows “cracked” open …


Time                                                  Outside                             Inside vehicle

9:15 a.m.

84 degrees

98 degrees

98 degrees

10 a.m.

88

103

105

10:30 a.m.

90

108

108

11 a.m.

92

113

109

12 noon

95

113

113

1 p.m.

101

114

115

  Two windows “cracked” open…


Time                                               Outside                                       Inside vehicle

8:30 a.m.

72 degrees

72 degrees

72 degrees

9:30 a.m.

80 degrees

95 degrees

95 degrees

12 noon

88 degrees

105 degrees

105 degrees

1:50 p.m.

99 degrees

109 degrees

109 degrees

2:30 p.m.

104 degrees

120 degrees

120 degrees

 

For more information about protecting your pets ( indoor and outdoor pets) contact your veterinarian. Check out these websites for information: newscientist.com mydogiscool.com hsus.org (Humane Society of the United States) aspca.org (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) phoenix.about.com/od/animvet/a/dogsheat.

Don't take your dog shopping when the temperature is above 70 degrees!!! Leave the dog at home when you go to the store or for a shopping trip. When you are at a shopping area parking lot please be alert for dogs, children, or elderly persons left in vehicles on days with temperatures of 75 degrees or more. Even with windows “cracked open” temperatures rise to very dangerous levels within as little as 10 minutes. If a citizen sees this situation where a child, person, or dog is left in a vehicle unattended and widows are closed a phone call to the Sheriff's Department or the City Police is strongly advised. Use your cell phone or go into a store to phone for help or to have a public announcement made… some stores have the equipment to do this. Have the model of the vehicle and the license number ready for getting help.

Please share this hot weather information with your family, friends, and neighbors!

Posted in Archives - All Archives, OMHS News - Current/Recent, Pet Health & Safety - Archive, Pet Health and Safety | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,